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Shadhika Shadhika

Impact

“Speaking about it doesn’t matter but doing something and showing people is what matters.”

–Priya, young woman of Shadhika

Since 2000, we’ve awarded over $1.4 million in grants and supported over 6,000 young women.

Less than 1% of young women supported are forced into child marriage (compared to 27% nationally)

  • 82% of Shadhika Scholars have been placed into jobs in the formal economy or are pursuing advanced degrees (compared to 27% of women nationally)

  • 86% of Shadhika Scholars report an increase in knowledge of their rights

  • 92% of Shadhika Scholars complete high school (compared to 48% nationally)

Graduates from our Scholars program are getting jobs in the formal economy and earning an average of $1,620 annually – three times higher than the average income in India.

  • 82% of Shadhika Scholars have been placed into jobs in the formal economy or are pursuing advanced degrees (compared to 27% of women nationally)

  • 97% of Shadhika Scholars are maintaining a B average or better – 57% are maintaining an A average.

  • 89% of Shadhika Scholars are registered to vote

Read more about our impact on our Blog

Shadhika’s Support Effect

August 5, 2019

It has been a long journey of 10 years with Vacha. This resource center, Vacha, has given me so many learning experiences that have enriched myself and my life both personal and social. As a student I have learned many things like English, Photography, the computer and Journalism. My confidence improved while learning these study   

Toilets

August 4, 2019

This is my first time walking down a lane, which is a small, three-foot-wide alley in which 5000 people reside. We were walking to the toilets, which was passionately talked about during a meeting with girls who are trying to make change in their basti (slum). Walking towards the toilets I notice piles of trash   

Wonder Women

June 4, 2019

“There’s a low hum in the room. At first, I look around, slightly annoyed, thinking someone is having a side conversation during the speaker’s presentation. Then I realize the sound is coming from a facilitator who is simultaneously translating the current lecture from Hindi to Bengali for two of the participants. When you are hosting